Saturday, October 04, 2008

October II

"You're confused because it feels right."

--Jack Young, to me in Acting class, when I stumbled over my lines just after Juliet and I twirled light-heartedly upstage in a genuinely giddy moment, during which I learned about myself that I had not merely been passively failing to find my inner 'juvenile,' I'd been actively resisting it.  I'm glad we got there, because it was fun.  Maybe I can do it again, one day--as Benedick or Berowne.
I decided that none of the monologues I did as part of my "Big Ten" were appropriate for the Texas Shakespeare Festival audition on November 1st.  So, I'm currently working on six new monologues, all of which are due on either Oct. 14th or 16th.  They are:
Shylock (voice assignment)
Leonato (Texas Shakes audition)
Malvolio (Texas Shakes audition)
Macbeth (three styles assignment)
Bollingbrook (chest res assignment)
Father (Henry VI Part III) (personalization assignment)

So, I'm learning not to get too precious in preparation.  I haven't the time.  (At this point, I think I know 20-25 Shakespeare monologues and 15-20 contemporary monologues, in various stages of disinterment, any of which can be up-and-running with a couple hours notice.)
I find that members of the first-year MFA ensemble freely express their personal passions in a manner I enjoy.  Some of the qualities I most respect in people are articulate passion (for anything), measured idealism, and aesthetic joy.  I do not enjoy people who feel threatened by these qualities and shoot them down with cool irony or ostentatious shows of apathy (e.g., by dismissive joking).  I find that people in the 'mediocre middle' in every field I've been in--creative, academic, journalistic--do a lot of shooting down.

3 comments:

Suzanne said...

I think they're called frustrated artists. :-)

Jacklyn said...

David you made my day.

David Loftus said...

It takes courage and maturity to be joyful and passionate . . . once one gets beyond chronological adolescence, anyway. Sarcasm and irony, like pepper, are strong condiments -- best used sparingly. Overuse is a sign of lack of taste.